Government Requirements for Safety Tool Use

In the U.S.A., there are many organizations such as the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), the Department of Energy (DOE), the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and MSHA (Mine Safety & Health Administration) that require or recommend the use of non-sparking hand tools in many industrial applications. For example, petroleum & chemical manufacturing, explosive and blasting agents, the marine industry, the mining industry, the paper industries, and spray booth operations, just to name a few, all require the use of non-sparking hand tools to eliminate fire and explosion hazards.

OSHA guidelines specifically cite the use of safety tools for handling of the following chemicals:

  • Acrylonitrile
  • Aluminum
  • Benzene
  • Chlorine dioxide
  • Chloroacetaldehyde
  • Chlorodiphenyl
  • Chloro-nitropropane
  • Coal dust
  • Crotonaldehyde
  • Cyanamide
  • Diborane
  • Dibutyl phthalate
  • Dichloroethylene
  • 2-Dichloroethylene
  • Dichloroethyl ether
  • Dichlorvos
  • Diethylamine
  • Diisopropylamine
  • Dimethylaniline
  • Dimethylamine
  • Dimethylphthalate
  • Dinitrobenzene
  • Dinitrotoluene
  • Dioxane
  • Dipropylene glycol methyl ether
  • Ethyl acetate
  • Ethyl acrylate
  • Ethylamine
  • Ethyl amyl ketone
  • Ethyl benzene
  • Ethyl bromide
  • Ethyl butyl ketone
  • Ethyl chloride
  • Ethyl ether
  • Ethyl silicate
  • Ethylenediamine
  • Ethylene oxide
  • n-Ethylmorpholine
  • Flourottrichloromethane
  • Furfural
  • Glycidol
  • Haptachlor
  • Heptane
  • n-Hexane
  • Hydrogen cyanide
  • Isobutyl alcohol
  • Isopropyl acetate
  • Isopropylamine
  • 4-Methoxyphenol
  • Nonane
  • Phenol
  • Trimethylamine
  • VM and naphtha
  • Zinc stearate